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We Will Withdraw From UN Torture Convention to Avoid Refugees Abusing the System

Jan 15th, 2016 | Advocacy, Government, Immigration, Legal, Media, Refugee Community, Rejection | Comment

Hong May Quit UN CAT

Protests Against Political Propaganda and Rhetoric About Refugees

Jan 14th, 2016 | Advocacy, Government, Immigration, Media, Opinion, Racism, Welfare | Comment

Socialist Action Protest Agaisnt Government Propaganda

Hong Kong May Quit UN Torture Convention, CY Leung Says

Jan 14th, 2016 | Advocacy, Government, Immigration, Media, Refugee Community | Comment

Hong Kong May Quit UN Torture Convetion, Says CY Leung

The Invisible Generation

Jan 14th, 2016 | Advocacy, Immigration, Media, Personal Experiences, Rejection, Welfare | Comment

Time Out 199.001_Cover_lowres3

Refugees in Hong Kong live in limbo under the ‘no work’ law

Jan 13th, 2016 | Advocacy, Immigration, Opinion, Refugee Community, Rejection, Welfare | Comment

From Hell to Purgatory

The Number of Homeless People has Increases Tremendously, Study Shows.

Jan 13th, 2016 | Advocacy, Government, Housing, Personal Experiences, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

Macrefugees Number Increases Tremendously

Police: No Truth In Fake Refugees Robbing Residents

Jan 12th, 2016 | Crime, Government, Legal, Media, Refugee Community, Rejection | Comment

Rumours about Fake Refugee

What’s My Future, Dad ?

Jan 11th, 2016 | Advocacy, Immigration, Opinion, Personal Experiences, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

My name is Cartier Dieodo and I am an organizer of the Refugee Union. I have a family in Hong Kong and I can never return to my country where the government murdered my father and brother.

 I often ask myself the question: “Do refugees have the right to a future and if so, what type?” Any parent will appreciate these burning questions moving in my mind when I look at my children and worry about their future as refugees in Hong Kong.

 There are certain observations that have stuck in my mind. I have often reflected upon them in over a decade of asylum in Hong Kong. I have also shared them with my friends. Our lives are awash with events we cannot control. But do we learn from them? Do we learn from the experience we gain?

 To turn an event into an experience, we have to reflect upon it, which takes time and focus. Only then can we learn from what happens in our life. I may be wrong, but this is what I believe. The stress and challenge of asylum make me think that if children have the right to education, then what about the parents? What kind of future can we expect raising children like this? How can parents train and raise children without prospects?

 An international psychologist taught me that a balance of education, work and family should be a person’s focus. It is the major issue around which so many problems arise. It is therefore relevant for refugees stuck in Hong Kong to ask: Do we have the right to a future? Is the past our future? What future can we offer our children? What will happen to them? I don’t have the answers.

 To raise a family in these harsh conditions is very hard. To live a life without a future goes against the nature of being human, because everyone strives for progress in life. To have no future as a refugee is a very challenging and complex situation when no solution is offered by the local government.

 Most refugee parents chose to ignore the issue as long as possible. They burry their head in the sand because they have no solution. Many refugee parents maybe do not fully understand the challenge of parenting their children in a fast-paced and dynamic cosmopolitan city – without hope.

 The complexity of daily life rises to a degree that calls for new mental capabilities and skills. We cannot live today how we lived yesterday, ignoring the future. It is desirable for all members of the refugee community, those with children and those without, to carefully consider what the future holds.

Parents in particular ought to take special considerations as they are responsible for their family. Without organization the majority of parents will be unable to grasp the new opportunities and rise to shape the future to the fullest of their ability. Those who fail will unfortunately regress.

 As parents we need to gain some knowledge to handle properly our children and ourselves for a better future, or there will be none. Strong parents can and will become progressively stronger. Weak parents will one day be challenged by their children asking: What’s my future, Dad?

What's my future, Dad

Hong Kong Refugee Crisis is a Ticking Time Bomb

Jan 6th, 2016 | Advocacy, Immigration, Opinion, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

To be a refugee in Hong Kong is one of the worst decisions one can ever make in life. Why one may choose to seek refuge in Hong Kong might be a matter of life and death. Most of the times options are also limited and the majority of refugees have no choice about where to seek asylum. Yet many will agree with me that it’s not easy to manage as a refugee in Asia’s World City.

In a bid to control and select the flow of travelers into Hong Kong, the Government has put into place a very strict and rigid immigration policy that ensures that only those visitors who are well endowed with resources are welcomed in.  As such it’s a city for the rich only. And understandably the Hong Kong Immigration Department aims to prevent undesirable visitors from entering. In this they have been successful.

On one hand we are here, arguably demonstrating failures of border controls. On the other, the refugees who manage to get into Hong Kong find themselves between a rock and a hard place. We must contend with a harsh environment that depicts us as illegal immigrants who should be removed as soon as possible. It’s important to note that refugees cannot lodge an asylum claim while their visitor visa is still valid – which forces us to overstay and thus commit an offense. The Immigration Department will turn you away with firm instructions to come back after your visa expired.

The Government thus turns refugees in to overstayers by forcing us to break the law and become illegal. The law is thereafter used against us as we are branded illegal immigrants. As a consequence we are subjected to psychological torture through a Removal Order that constantly hangs over our head.

As illegal immigrants, refugees do not have legal status, nor do we enjoy many rights as enshrined in the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  We are stuck in limbo with no future prospects. Having no working rights forces us to lead a miserable life, of hopelessness and despair. We are made to depend on government welfare that is grossly inadequate. No surprise that many refugees resort to other means of survival to make ends meet.

We are told by the government that Hong Kong never signed the Refugee Convention. Therefore it does not have an obligation to assist refugees. Using this strategy, authorities continues to marginalize and frustrate us by ensuring that we are not economically empowered, arguably in a bid to force us to give up on our asylum claims and leave this city.

Those refugees who start a family soon realize they are condemned to a cycle of poverty that is next to impossible to break. First, parents are not financially stable to afford a decent life for their children as they are limited by what the Social Welfare Department refers to as “Humanitarian Assistance”. Secondly, children are refugees as their parents. That means they are in same category and cannot enjoy equal rights as resident children.

The term “Humanitarian Assistance” is a euphemism used to avoid taking responsibility for (and arguably punish) refugees criminalized for earning a living. The cycle repeats itself for the refugee family as the children follow the same route as their parents through the humanitarian assistance program that fails to meet their basic needs.

What will happen to these families who continue to live in abject poverty?

The government is courting disaster. Truth be told, the chickens will eventually come home to roost. The next generation of Hong Kong-born refugees is highly disadvantaged and marginalized. It will eventually form a section of society that cannot support itself. They will resort to other means of survival to make ends meet.

It appears that Hong Kong is unwilling to care for, nor does it empower refugees to compete effectively for opportunities in this competitive city. The government and its policy-makers have continuously ignored and brushed aside the truth, which one day will come back to haunt them. The neglected children may one day become an even greater social problem than their parents.

A practical example which can provide a good case study for Hong Kong is given by the French riots and the tangle of poverty and lack of security in the suburbs of Paris. It is a global world after all.

Refugee Crisis is a Ticking Time Bomb

HAPPY NEW YEAR WISHES TO ALL REFUGEES AND SUPPORTERS

Dec 31st, 2015 | Advocacy, Opinion, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

Greetings Refugees and Supporters,

My name is Cartier Dieodo and I have been a refugee in Hong Kong for over 10 years, living in misery with my family, because Hong Kong Government does not allow me to work. I am a coordinator of the Refugee Union and will be a regular contributor of blogs to this website.

Dear Brothers and Sisters, I wish you all a happy new year! Here we are about to end the year. Firstly we need to give glory to God, as we are still alive and healthy. I think also that we need to ask several question concerning the past year and make some resolutions for the next, as many people do.

What was great this year?

2015 was definitely a great year as we achieved some goals: the first year of the Refugee Union; launching this website to reach supporters locally and internationally; conducting dozens of interviews with journalist, TV reports and university students; closing the refugee slums; receiving food coupons, instead of rubbish food collections; getting some kindergarten support, and publicizing the Zero Percent Acceptance Rate with the media and the public. 

It was something, but it was not enough.

Are we not supposed get better support than this as refugees? How do we rent rooms for 1500$ and eat three times a day with 1200$ a month (or 40$ a day)? How do we school our children without full financial assistance if not allowed to work? Why does Hong Kong recognize so few refugees, or 37 of almost 20,000 asylum claims since 1992? How can Hong Kong get away with such shameful treatment of refugees? Why do 10,000 refugees live in misery and destitution in Hong Kong?

If the results were positive, why and who was behind that motivation?
What were the main strategies and goals in 2015?
How do we improve our strategies and goals in 2016?

There is experience growing in our Union and it is our responsibility to ask ourselves: What went well? What went wrong? How can we make it better by changing strategy? How do we organize more action from Refugee Union members? How do we reach out to more supporters in Hong Kong?

Let us come together for a solution that satisfies all members and brings more powerful results to our community. We already know that many organizations, schools, companies and people want to know more about our struggle and are offering their generous support. We are most thankful to them all.

Dear Brothers and Sisters, we must all stand as Brother’s Keepers to one another. United we can achieve much more. May 2016 be the year of determination, a year of communication, of love, respect, support and caring. May peace and success shine in 2016!

Happy new year and remain bless.

One Love    

Happy new year images 2016

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