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Why refugee education is a problem – and six solutions

Apr 5th, 2017 | Advocacy, Education, Personal Experiences, Racism, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

Why Refugee Education is a big Problem
Refugee Education Problem

Former refugee From Somalia Appointed Immigration Minister

Jan 12th, 2017 | Advocacy, Education, Government, Legal, Racism, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

The Star 11th Jan 2017 Former Refugee Appointed Minister
Refugee Minister

FINDING A DIFFERENT NARRATIVE IN HONG KONG

Dec 5th, 2016 | Advocacy, Education, Food, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

A different Narrative

Empowering Refugees Lives

Mar 7th, 2016 | Advocacy, Education, Refugee Community | Comment

SCMP 06 March 2016 Empowering Refugees

Health In Action Launches a Program for Refugees

Jan 27th, 2016 | Advocacy, Education, Health, Refugee Community, Welfare | Comment

Health Program For Asylum Seekers

Volunteer inspires students to help the needy

Nov 16th, 2015 | Education, Personal Experiences, Refugee Community | Comment

In March 2014, my sister invited me to support the Refugee Union in one of their protests in Wanchai: “Occupy SWD Against Corruption”. After the demonstration, I knew more about the suffering situation of such a long-neglected disadvantaged group. Then, I did more research on the Refugee Union, which is a registered society for protecting asylum seekers in Hong Kong with the aim of safeguarding refugee rights and improving the protection, wellbeing and future prospect of all refugees.

Many refugees and asylum seekers are still being held up indefinitely and they might even lose hopes in life. I felt that I could offer my support especially to the young kids who are very vulnerable to their surroundings, yet it is not their choices. The children do not know what is going on around them. In order to better develop their potential and help them to better integrate into the society, I offered my time and efforts in preparing a weekly free Cantonese class every Saturday afternoon. Apart from helping them to deal with the difficulties in homework, I would also prepare and conduct tailor-made supplementary Cantonese notes for them, such as the written art work, poems, songs and various innovative games for them to practice the local language.

Throughout a year of voluntary teaching, I encountered difficulties in designing the teaching materials. Since learning diversity exists between those studying kindergarten and the others studying primary school 2 or 3, I had to adjust the level of the content. Also, I recruited some helpers to assist those young children with poorer Chinese levels. In addition, I was challenged to plan innovative and creative learning activities. Fortunately, I received much good advice from my school teachers, helpers from other universities and friends.

This opportunity inspired me to take related courses, research and read books regarding teaching Chinese to non-Chinese students. I am more confident in arranging Chinese learning activities which will motivate young kids. I think they will learn something from my class and be more capable in breaking down the language barriers. I would like to give thanks to the parents of the refugee kids since they help a lot to manage the class discipline.  

I am glad that I have been growing up with the children of the Refugee Union for a year. Having Cantonese class with them is very enjoyable and meaningful since they are eager to learn and often bring happiness to me. Moreover, I have met many refugees who have travelled a long way to Hong Kong, and I admire their extraordinary resilience and tenacity. Through teaching these energetic and enthusiastic youngsters, I strive to assist them in integrating into the society, so they may have equal opportunities to fully contribute their potential. I am also confident that my students will share my dedication to help the needy in society.

Volunteer inspires students to help others in society

Speech at the HK Institute of Education

Nov 10th, 2015 | Advocacy, Education, Immigration, RU Opinion, Welfare | Comment

RU speech to HKIEd on 6 November 2015

Hong Kong Not Immune to World Refugee Crisis

Nov 7th, 2015 | Advocacy, Education, Government | Comment

The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd) today (6 November) hosted a forum entitled Educating Hong Kong’s Refugee Children: Policy and Practice, with various stakeholder groups joining the discussion, including teachers, representatives from nongovernmental organisations, refugee parents and members of the public.

Organised by the Centre for Governance and Citizenship and supported by the Faculty of Education and Human Development (FEHD), the symposium recognised that although Hong Kong receives limited numbers of refugees, refugee children in particular pose challenges for society and the government. International agreements commit the government to providing access to schooling for these children, but school fees and other purchases make that access difficult for some families.

Dr York Chow Yat­ngok, Chairperson of the Equal Opportunities Commission, opened the Forum. Professor John Lee Chi­kin, Vice President (Academic) of HKIEd, then stressed that ‘education can transform societies and individuals, including refugees. Asylum seekers, both here in Hong Kong and elsewhere, struggle to be self­-sufficient, and it is education that can equip them develop the necessary skills and knowledge’.

A number of Hong Kong schools have opened their doors to refugee children. Ms Olivia Lo Tinoi, Assistant Education Officer from the Education Bureau’s Newly Arrived Children Support Unit, introduced the current services provided for refugee children, and Dr Rizwan Ullah from Delia Memorial School (Hip Wo) discussed his experience teaching them.

Among the panel speakers was Ms Adella Namagembe from the Refugee Union, who discussed the perspectives of refugee parents and their experiences in seeking educational opportunities for their children.

Dr Terence Shum Chun­tat from the Technological and Higher Education Institute of Hong Kong, who has been studying the situation of refugees and asylum seekers in Hong Kong, discussed his observations of the current policy direction.

Dr Isabella Ng Fung Sheung from the Department of Asian and Policy Studies, who also volunteers at the Hong Kong Society for Asylum Seekers and Refugees, presented her analysis of policy implementation and the difficulties faced by refugee children and their parents in Hong Kong.

Professor Bob Adamson, Chair Professor of Curriculum Reform, concluded the forum by highlighting that ‘Hong Kong, being an international city, needs to reach out to its refugees and asylum seekers to demonstrate its social responsibility and compassion’.

Hong Kong Not Immune to World Refugee Crisis

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